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Marmarth Research Foundation: In the Hell Creek Formation of North Dakota

Marmarth Research Foundation

In the Hell Creek formation of North Dakota

Testimonials

"I had a really wonderful time in Marmarth. I have now realized that Paleontology is something that I am interested in and want to go to school to study. It is really neat what you have going here in Marmarth, there really isn't anything like it. I really had a great time out there. I met some really great people that I got the chance to work with, and I had great fun as well. It would really be cool if I could come back and perhaps do it again. And it would be cool if I would get the chance to work with the same people."

Courtney Hadanek
Shephard High School


"There are many reasons I participate each summer; the sheer beauty of the Badlands, the amazing people I get to meet and work with, and the satisfaction that my summer vacation was not spent being lazy. But what it comes down to is that first time you're out in the field working a dig site and you uncover the fossilized bone of an animal that died over 65 million years ago and you're the first human being to touch it!"

Jeff Cardin
Stock Broker


"It's one frill after another!"

Norman Gardiner, Ivanhoe, Australia
Retired English Professor


"In the four years I have been digging with MRF, I have found the experience to be very rewarding. I continue to return there each summer because I have found the MRF staff are patient and friendly with new comers, and provide challenges to those with more experience. MRF has established a well rounded learning environment which is second to none. At MRF you experience Paleontology from excavation of the specimen in the field to its complete preparation in the laboratory."

Al Flemming
Criminal Investigations Supervisor


"It was the adventure of a lifetime!"

Bob Gross, Swarthmore, PA
Retired Swarthmore College Dean


"A life long dream of finding a dinosaur skeleton came true while on a MRF dig in 2006. It was a fantastic experience to learn from the professional MRF staff the techniques in excavating and preparing a fossil skeleton, especially one which was personally discovered."

John A. Pawloski
Connecticut Museum of Mining and Mineral Science